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Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

10 edition of The concept of punishment in German idealism found in the catalog.

The concept of punishment in German idealism

by Jean-Christophe Merle

  • 26 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge, UK, New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Kant, Immanuel, -- 1724-1804,
  • Punishment -- Philosophy,
  • Criminal law -- Philosophy,
  • Idealism, German

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementJean-Christophe Merle ; translated from the German by Joseph J. Kominkiewicz with Jean-Christophe Merle and Frances Brown.
    SeriesModern European philosophy
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsK5103 .M47 2008
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23186249M
    ISBN 109780521886840
    LC Control Number2009009615

    Critical Studies in German Idealism, Volume: 10 E-Book ISBN: Request PDF | On Mar 1, , Thom Brooks published German Idealism and the Concept of Punishment, by Jean-Christophe Merle, trans. Joseph J. Kominkiewicz with .

    This book has something to say. A chief virtue of Michael Mack's German Idealism and the Jew is its strong conceptual drive. It pursues its central thesis with a relentlessness that sees it sometimes repetitious. Even when it engages in close analysis of its chosen material, the reader does not want for . Understanding the importance of German Idealism, Cambridge University Press has published a four-volume series, The Impact of Idealism: The Legacy of Post-Kantian German Thought, edited by Nicholas Boyle and Liz Disley. The first volume focusses upon philosophy and the natural sciences, the second, upon historical, social and political thought.

      Mark Theunissen reviews Jean-Cristophe Merle’s German Idealism and the Concept of Punishment, published by Cambridge University Press (). Article available through Philosophy Documentation Center, here. Mark Theunissen, review of German Idealism and [ ]. Spinoza and German Idealism - edited by Eckart Förster September Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this book to your organisation's collection. Spinoza and German Idealism. Edited by Eckart Förster, Yitzhak Y. Melamed; Online ISBN:


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The concept of punishment in German idealism by Jean-Christophe Merle Download PDF EPUB FB2

German Idealism and the Concept of Punishment (Modern European Philosophy) [Merle, Jean-Christophe] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. German Idealism and the Concept of Punishment (Modern European Philosophy)Author: Jean-Christophe Merle.

: German Idealism and the Concept of Punishment (Modern European Philosophy) (): Merle, Jean-Christophe: BooksCited by: 6. Jean-Christophe Merle's aim in German Idealism and the The concept of punishment in German idealism book of Punishment is twofold. First, he presents a novel interpretation of the accounts of punishment that we find in the practical writings of Kant, Fichte, and Hegel.

At the same time, Merle's book constitutes a sustained criticism of retributivist theories of punishment. ‘Merle's book is a first-rate, refreshingly new piece of scholarship on Kant and German idealism.

Almost all scholarship on the philosophers in question either argue or just assume that Kant, Fichte, and Hegel are retributivists when it comes to by: 6. German Idealism and the Concept of Punishment.

by Jean-Christophe Merle. Modern European Philosophy. Share your thoughts Complete your review. Tell readers what you thought by rating and reviewing this book. Rate it * You Rated it *Brand: Cambridge University Press. 'Merle's book is a first-rate, refreshingly new piece of scholarship on Kant and German idealism.

Almost all scholarship on the philosophers in question either argue or just assume that Kant, Fichte, and Hegel are retributivists when it comes to punishment.

German Idealism and the Concept of Punishment (Modern European Philosophy) Jean-Christophe Merle Against the background of early modernism - a period that justified punishment by general deterrence - Kant is usually thought to represent a radical turn towards retributivism.

GERMAN IDEALISM AND THE CONCEPT OF PUNISHMENT Against the background of early modernism – a period that justified punishment by general deterrence – Kant is usually thought to represent a radical turn toward retributivism.

For Kant, and later for Fichte and Hegel, a just punishment respects the humanity inherent. German Idealism and the Concept of Punishment 作者: Merle, Jean-Christophe 出版年: 页数: 定价: $ ISBN: 豆瓣评分. One of the very few accounts in English of German idealism, this ambitious work advances and revises our understanding of both the history and the thought of the classical period of German philosophy.

As he traces the structure and evolution of idealism as a doctrine, Frederick Beiser exposes a strong objective, or realist, strain running from Kant to Hegel and identifies the crucial role. Get this from a library. German Idealism and the Concept of Punishment. [Jean-Christophe Merle] -- Examines the views of the German Idealists on punishment, and traces their gradual move in favour of deterrence and resocialisation.

Lee "German Idealism and the Concept of Punishment" por Jean-Christophe Merle disponible en Rakuten Kobo. Against the background of early modernism - a period that justified punishment by general deterrence - Kant is usually t.

German Idealism And The Concept Of Punishment è un libro di Merle Jean-Christophe edito da Cambridge University Press a maggio - EAN puoi acquistarlo sul sitola grande libreria online. German Idealism is arguably the most influential force in philosophy over the past two hundred years.

This major four-volume work is the first comprehensive survey of its impact on science, religion, sociology and the humanities, and brings together fifty-two leading scholars from across Europe and North America.

German idealism was a philosophical movement that emerged in Germany in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. It developed out of the work of Immanuel Kant in the s and s, and was closely linked both with Romanticism and the revolutionary politics of the best-known thinkers in the movement, besides Kant, were Johann Gottlieb Fichte, Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph.

Against the background of early modernism - a period that justified punishment by general deterrence - Kant is usually thought to represent a radical turn towards retributivism. For Kant, and later for Fichte and Hegel, a just punishment respects the humanity inherent in the criminal, and serves.

Critical Studies in German Idealism, Volume: 25 E-Book ISBN: German Idealism Books Showing of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit (Paperback) by. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (shelved 17 times as german-idealism) avg rating — 14, ratings — published Want to Read saving Want to Read.

One of the very few accounts in English of German idealism, this ambitious work advances and revises our understanding of both the history and the thought of the classical period of German philosophy.

As he traces the structure and evolution of idealism as a doctrine, Frederick Beiser exposes a strong objective, or realist, strain running from Kant to Hegel and identifies the crucial role of 4/5(2). German Idealism and the Concept of Punishment Article in British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18(5) December with 3 Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Critical theory is a social philosophy pertaining to the reflective assessment and critique of society and culture in order to reveal and challenge power origins in sociology, as well as in literary criticism, it argues that social problems are influenced and created more by societal structures and cultural assumptions than by individual and psychological factors.German Idealism grew out of this crisis of the Enlightenment.

All its various forms – the transcendental idealism of Kant, the ethical idealismof Fichte, and the absolute idealism of the romantics – were so many attempts to resolve these aporiai of the Enlightenment.

For all. The German Idealism Reader is a comprehensive account of the key ideas and arguments central to German idealists and their immediate critics.

Expanding the scope beyond the four best-known representatives - Kant, Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel - and including those thinkers often considered as secondary, but who are also crucial for understanding of this period, the Reader .